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while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >> this is just the beginning of something much bigger. >> thank god i didn't have to suffer what he had to go through. >> this sunday, the premiere of "into eternity". >> i am now in this place where you should never come. >> how do you contain 100,000 years of nuclear danger? >> it is an invisible danger. >> al jazeera
. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their te
with the president. and that day, i'll tell you, our work paid off. people came from all over america. some americans living abroad flew home to participate in the march. people came from almost every state, people from idaho, wyoming, montana, church groups, labor groups, student groups, just plain, everyday individuals. >> rose: and what did your heart say to you when you heard martin luther king say, "i have a dream?" >> when martin luther king jr. got to that place in that speech and said, "i have a dream today, a dream deeply rooted in the american dream," i knew he was preaching and he was really preaching. he knew it himself. he turned those marble steps of the lincoln memorial into a modern day pulpit and the crowds were with him. jackson did a song how we got over, how we got over, and the whole place just rocked and rocked. >> rose: let me give you some timeline. april 16, dr. king writes his famous letters from a birmingham jail, and responded to white alabama ministers who urged him to end the demonstration. on june 12 medgar edgars was assassinated. what did you end that day with that yo
, but that is a dangerous belief, said the president. dr. king called america the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. he was right. and still is today. when profit motive and property rights are considered more important than people, he said, militarism is incapable of being conquered. a true revolution of values will look and easily on the glaring contrast to party and well. thise revelation will say way of settling differences is not just. american can lead the way in the revolution of values. no document can make these humans any less of our brothers. the true meaning of compassion and non-parlance is when it helps us to see the enemies point of view. there is nothing to prevent us from re- ordering our priorities. the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. let us practice what they -- >> ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the national but justice coalition -- of the national black justice coalition. >> one of my mentors told me in order to truly be free, you must give to causes greater than yourself. every day, and educate, allocate, and celebrate the lot
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
to what could be a turning point for america and our involvement in syria. tonight, violent new clashes erupting right where the alleged chemical weapons attacks took place this week. and this evening a haunting new number. one million children sent fleeing from the violence, without homes, some of them ripped from their parents. that's the equivalent of all the children in boston and los angeles combined. tonight it's what the president is now saying about those alleged chemical attacks that signals america might soon be involved. abc's martha raddatz in the region on what it was the president said. >> reporter: these are the images that have had the white house huddled in marathon meetings. the suspected chemical attack, syrian women, children, estimates ranging upward of 1,000 killed. >> what we've seen indicates this is clearly a big event of grave concern. >> reporter: speaking to cnn, the president raising the stakes. >> that starts getting to some core national interests that the united states has. >> reporter: syria's chaos. its chemical weapons and its breeding of terror, a thr
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
story is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. then, a big question that affects us all. for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skryscrapers and congest 8? more detroits? we will look at the upsides and the downsides of an ever more urban world. we have a terrific panel that has some surprising ideas. >>> also les miserables. it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. but first here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in the world of young democracies. from egypt to turkey to brazil, protests, marches and, of course, one coup. as we watch the turbulence around the globe, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is but rather how undemocratic it is. hear me out. we have three co-equal branches of government and the one with the final say on m
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
.s. aid, and an alliance that is one of america east most important in the middle east. and authorities have arrested mohammed badie. separately judicial officials say a court will review a petition to release, hosni mubarak. mubarak is waiting to be retried on charges of being behind the killi killings that take place. >>> and demonstrators waved flags and posters of ousted president, morsi. egypt's cabinet says more than 850 civilians have been killed in the last week. the muslim brotherhood puts the toll much higher. let's begin in washington with mike viqueira. mike what is the latest on the meeting with the president and his national security team? >> well that meeting broke up just a short time ago, tony. we don't yet have a readout. we know egypt was certainly tops on the agenda. what to do about u.s. aid that is still blowing after the chaos, killing and carnage. under mounting pressure to halt payments to egypt, today a flat denial from the white house that aid has already been cut off. >> this is not just a faucet in which you turn the spigot. whether tranches of aid have gone
welcome t to al jazeera america. president obama considers cutting aid egypt after weeks oh of bloodshed. billions is on the line. burning up, more than 50 wild fires out of control this wes in states and they are running out of resources. >> in bangladesh, how put americans are putting lives in danger. >> we begin in egypt. the violent and bloody change of government there. the u.s. is rethinking its relationship, powerful mideast allie. president obama met with his security advisors today about possibly cutting the billions of aid to egypt. the same time the white house is condemning accusations by turkey's prime minister that israel had a hand in the overthrow of president morsi. we are watching developments in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here s
on washington, has been credited for changing mainstream america, white america's view of the civil rights movement and the fight against segregation. is this your experience? do you think that's true? >> i do believe that's true, not because of correspondents who were covering it but because of the nature of the times, the development of television, the pervasive use of television. television was just coming into most homes in the late '50s and '60s, been around before then. but there's no question that television's coverage of the civil rights movement, taking into people's living rooms what was happening, not some newspaper description or some highly censored or sanitized view, it brought the reality of the viciousness of the opposition to civil rights, particularly in the deep south, into people's living rooms. and then the eloquence and courage of dr. king and those who worked with him, such as john lewis, now a congressman, people could see and hear for themselves. television was the instrument. before television it was easy to deny how much violence there was. it was easy to overloo
. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. can you say stocktopussy? g102 2 more news. ♪ >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their team. >> reporter: it's at the edge of locust grove high school football field just out of atlanta, where glen jones has the best view. his son was forrest jones, number 71 on the football team. drive. >> he was a hard worker. he just went aft
jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. ♪ >>> welcome back everyone, as president obama tries to ratchet up support for his economic policies he is targeting a key constituency focused on the soaring cost of higher education. david shuster has the report. [ cheers ] >> at the university of buffalo, the president announced ambitious changes to make colleges more affordable and accountable for their costs. >> college has never been more expensive. over the past three decades, the average tuition at a public, four-year college has gone up by more than 250%. >
far. >>> those are the headlines at that hour. "america tonight" is next on al jazeera. i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern time, 8 pacific. ♪ >>> on "america tonight," building the case for action against syria, u.s. forces stand ready to go now what is next? >>> a spike in temperatures forces a time-out. the hid endangers for young athletes, and what can save them. >> we helped him up and started walking back to school, and the fell once again. >>> and timeless words scrawled on scraps, how the letter from birmingham jail lead to a revolutionary moment in american history. >> the letter was a call to the national conscious of america. ♪ >>> and good evening. thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. a showdown looms with washington tonight that western powers are gearing up for some kind of military strike against the government of bashar al-assad. tell us what all of this means. and what is going to happen next? >> the white house insists that the president has not yet made a decision to go ahead with military strikes. you would not know that from the rhetoric with -- from
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in size. one of america's most popular national parks is in threat. >>> san diego's mayor may step down tomorrow. >>> and a sinkhole drains water right out of the bayou. now a lawsuit is in the works. ♪ >>> more international outrage tonight over allegations of chemical weapons attack in syria. now it is willing reported that not only were runs killed but emergency responders who helped the victims died too. here is what we know right now. president obama has directed the u.s. intelligence community to quickly gather information about the alleged use of chemical weapons. the u.s. state department says syrian rebels do not have the means for chemical war fair. but the government is denying it used any toxic weapons. we want to warn you the video we are about to show you is graphic. we cannot independently verify that -- john what are you hearing from the un. >> we are hearing from officials all over the world today. but all of them keen to couch their words very carefully because as william hague said today this remains unkw unkwap -- uncooperated evidence. . -- let's hear from two lea
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
america's best today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you >>> thanks for joining us this morning. award wink mystery writer eleanor leonard has passed away. produced get shorty, 52 pickup, and many of those books were adapted into screen. leonard suffered a stroke two weeks ago. the author died in his home in michigan. >>> new information this morning on beau biden's son -- or beau biden, the son of vice president joe biden. there's word he is being evaluated at a cancer center in texas. biden felt weak and disoriented after driving to indiana for a family vacation. this is not the first health scare for beau biden who became delaware's attorney general in 2007. after a mild stroke in may of 2010 he spent a week at the hospital and more than a month recuperating at home. >>> health problems that forced aretha franklin from attend an event in chicago. major league baseball was set to honor her as the beacon of change honor row. she says she's unable to travel. she
>>> good morning, america. this morning, breaking overnight with the frantic search for hundreds of people missing after a ferry collides, a cargo ship. some victims are trapped inside the boat as it goes underwater. how could this happen? >>> caught on tape. good samaritans spoil a wild bank robbery with money flying everywhere, chasing down and tackling the suspect after he was blocked by a truck. we'll hear from the hero this is morning. >>> getting home, the son of jerry remy charged with the bloody murder of his long-time girlfriend in front of their 4-year-old daughter. were there warning signs that this was going to happen? >>> you ready? >> summer concert surprise. a woman pops the question to her girlfriend at our big mack he mother concert in central park. it didn't make it on air, but it was all over social media. >> i proposed to her on stage. >> we have the happy couple live to talk about their love moment. >> from abc news, life from new york, this is "good morning america." >>> what a concert yesterday. good morning, america. as you can see, dan is not here, he's o
it be in america there was a sting. now that you understand you have more of a dialogue. realistically we stopped talking to our young people. hopefully it open to dialogue to take time and talk to her children. and listen to them and start by saying something like hello or giving a smile. i always say on a personal note it's an eye-opener and something we need to continue to try to embrace in our children and our community because it starts with us. thank you. >> thank you very much. >> i just want to say that that synergy i spoke of having all these organizations and these institutions all have to work together. i think that is key and perhaps your organization could be the one that starts the ball rolling and starts the communication but i think that does have to happen. >> as long as we can get some cards from you and you could give us some support that would be great. >> if i could add to that quickly also. one common thread through all of our work is we look to history and different kinds of history to find instances of structural oppression, the structural violence and racism and responses
>>> good morning, america. breaking overnight. the president's tough words for syrian leader, bashar al assad, as u.n. inspectors prepare to leave syria, american warships move into position. the entire middle east bracing for an attack. and we're live from the region. >>> i wish to god these circumstances had been different. >> an abc news exclusive interview with george zimmerman's wife, speaking out for the first time about the night trayvon martin was shot. and the terrifying months in hiding with her husband. >>> breaking overnight. explosive allegations about nfl star aaron hernandez. was he using angel dust and carrying a gun at all times? now, big questions about how much patriots coach bill belichick really knew about his player's behavior. >>> shocking on the racetrack when a driver loses control. trapped him and engulfed in flames. how he walked away, racing in the same car just 30 minutes later. >>> and good morning, america. the crisis in syria continues to grow. so many developments right now, as that deadline looms for the u.n. inspectors to leave syria. there
on the country did states of america coming out of the closet and singing here is how i think the social war should be taught. should be taught in terms of people understanding on what would have happened if the war turned out differently. >> up next on the special weeknight edition of book tv. author national book award winning author nathaniel philbrick -- he discusses this in massachusetts for 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it's an honor to be introduced by a fellow nantucketer both of our kids were educated by them and it is great to see you here in brookline and it's wonderful to be in the coolidge center theater with this great bookstore and co-sponsored with the massachusetts historical society, which has been an institution that has been absolutely essential to my life as a historian. i sometimes sort of feel like i've taken up residence in the archives there, and every book i've done there has been a central information that has come from there but among the more so than bunker hill. one of the characters i delve into, the papers are there at what we call the mhs and it is an
to new york and good morning america. lynette charles is is standing by as we continued and you have stressed we may not be out of the woods for the day. >> so we have the round this morning and we have not had the cold front move through. once that slides through a little later we can see another round of the clashing of the air masses possibly more severe weather. >> all right. as you can find out the latest on this going to abc2news.com and bc2an and twitter and storm shield app and take advantage and we will stay on the story throughout the course of the day bringing outmost accurate information that we know now to new york be safe out there. jon karl from the white house. >> reporter: a clear sign she has not retired from politics. hillary clinton gave her first major policy speech since stepping down as secretary of state. and made it clear there's much more to come. she's back. in a speech before the american bar association, hillary clinton announced she plans to give a series of big policy speeches in the coming months. monday night, she addressed voting rights and racial di
of america's great allies in this region awash in blood. last month, i witnessed peaceful protests here. when i returned yesterday, i found a country with scars that will take decades to heal. it began with the military ousting of mohammed morsi, egypt's first-ever democratically elected president and the leader of the muslim brotherhood party. morsi supporters refused to stop demonstrations, despite threats from the military. which moved in last wednesday to crush them. more than a thousand people have been killed. thousands more injured in the past week, the military intervention sparked outrage in the u.s. and across the world. fors first time, we got an explanation from the interim prime minister. the world has seen the pictures, 900, a thousand dead in the pro-morsi camps? >> i am not sure you have seen the true pictures. >> do you wish that initial assault had gone differently? that there was too much force? >> we announced it, telling them this cannot continue. it is bad. we are open for dialogue. but they insisted. and they had weapons. and it was discovered. they used weapons. i am n
>>> good morning, america. and breaking overnight. >> whoa. >> yosemite on fire. our reporter, just outside the national park, there on the fire line. remarkable shots from the air. more than 19,000 firefighters in more than 10 states across the west, battling these flames right now. >>> i consider myself a survivor. my mom raised me to be strong. >> also breaking, hannah anderson speaks out. the 16-year-old revealing for the first time what really happened when she was abducted. and on the run. and the shocking allegation now from her kidnapper's sister. >>> what do i need to do in order to not circumvent anything, follow the law. because this is ridiculous. >> caught on tape. the rising political star, pressing police to let his niece out of jail. he says, he was just helping out a relative in trouble. the surprising reaction from the cops. was his call for freedom an abuse of power? ♪ i'm on top of the world >>> just plane crazy. look at this. yep. that's two 9-year-old girls standing on two planes, flying at 100 miles an hour, right into the record books. >>> and a very good m
'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >>> the american soldier responsible for killing 16 afghan civilians is apologizing. robert bales took the stand in the sentencing phase of his military trial, and rob reynolds reports on his apology, and what it means for his case. >> reporter: i wish i could take it back, but i can't. speaking in a low, halting voice, bales apologized to the families of the african civilians he murdered, and said he disgraced his own family. what i did was an act of cowardous bales concluded, behind a mas
>>> good morning, america. to our viewers in the west. breaking right now. state of emergency. egypt in chaos. tens of thousands of protesters pouring into the streets on this day of rage. teargas thrown. we're live from cairo. >>> breaking overnight, hannah anderson in public for the first time since her ordeal. family and friends rallying around her. and now, new details that show her abduction was carefully planned. her kidnapper, stockpiling weapons before he stole her away. >>> two, separate, shocking bear attacks at one of the most popular national parks in the country. hikers charged by a momma grizzly. hear how they fought her off. >>> i'm calling to report stuff stolen. >> a frantic 911 call. a wedding dress stolen from a bride-to-be, just hours before she walked down the aisle. and the dramatic save by the emergency dispatcher to get that bride to the church on time. >>> certainly tucked in at home. big morning ahead here. we want to first take you, just north of here, central park. could be our biggest crowd and concert of the summer. i'm just going to own this. "go
>>> good morning, america. and breaking overnight, a sudden and massive hailstorm, knocking out towns in the west. cars filled. snowplows are forced to clean it all up. entire streets turn to rivers, as a week of flash flooding looms. and the fire at yosemite, now tripling in size. zblanchts breaking at this hour. president obama's tough words on the syria crisis right now. calling the potential use of chemical weapons there, a grave concern. >> no doubt that when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale, and again, we're still gathering information about this particular event. but it is very troublesome. >>> and a surprise this morning. ♪ batman >> the new batman revealed. oscar-winner, ben affleck, will be bruce wayne. the choice makes headlines worldwide, as he gets set to go up against superman. >>> and a major announcement this morning about these two adorable cubs. "gma's" exclusive access to the nursery of the only panda twins in america, as they wave good morning, america. >>> they were waving on the inside, lara. i'm sure. hello, america. good morning t
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that writes about george washington of south america. in the civil war battle of gettysburg. >> tomorrow a military briefing in east afghanistan. we will talk about violence in the area and live coverage begins at 10:30 a.m. eastern on c-span2. >> tomorrow night on the encore presentation of first ladies. >> is unusual but i'm sure that she will tell you about this and i think that having read this and read about her, she was a very happy girl. and she goes through the official title, which wasn't normally part of this. >> the encore at a first ladies. an original on c-span. >> the first battle of the american revolution is discussed by nathaniel philbrick in his book "bunker hill: a city, a siege, a revolution." he discussed it in brookline, massachusetts. >> thank you, it is an honor to be introduced. both of the kids were educated by them and it is wonderful to see you here at brookline. corresponding with the massachusetts historical society which has been an institution that has been absolutely essential. every archive i've done has been information that has come from there essenti
supports the nsa surveillance program. he says the program itself works in protecting america from terrorism and has what he calls a 99.99% batting average in being compliant. >> this whole tone of snooping and spying that we use i think it's horrible, it's a distortion and a smear and a slander of good patriotic americans. >> reporter: senator rand paul, by the way, says the constitutionality of the nsa program must be evaluated. steve? >> thank you very much. peter king went directly at rand paul, said basically he's lying about the program. and he's just breathless in defending it as michael hayden. where is the president? he doesn't go to pat for this. he's analyzing this and it's his program. from michael hayden he says "the washington post" publishes this story. look at the numbers. there's been 115 incidents, incorrectly entered. mistakes made. none intentional. so that's out of 61 million inquiries a compliance rate of 99.998. look beyond the numbers and the headlines. >> right. michael hayden has and i temple in the "usa today" today where he talks in an op-ed just trust u
scandals. he was referring to claims republican law americas that the administration misled the public about the nature of the attack by stressing the connection to an anti islam film. some law americas aren't dealing very lightly. they continue to push for more answers. behind closed doors they met with bristol who was leading an elite task force when the terrorists attacked the benghazi consulate. he spoke in a classified briefing yesterday. sources tell us he confirmed what other military brass told law americas despite what the white house does claim u.s. officials were not prepared heading into the attacks on 9-11. those lawmakers tell us they are not giving up. take a look at this. >> they are in campaign mode. you need to have trust in the government and when our government targets people based on the tax code when our government miss leads the country about a terrorist attack in benghazi that erodes trust and then when our commander-in-chief says this is phony there's no reason to be concerned about this there's nothing to see here, that's just arrogance. >> they continue to vo
this morning. >>> good morning, america. breaking this morning, funnel clouds reported right now over maryland. heavy rains over the west. two dead, so many running from the raging waters. 16 states in the flood zone right now. >>> and overnight, a shocking fall. a major league baseball game. a fan plunging 65 feet from the upper deck, right in front of horrified spectators. why does this keep happening? and what can be done to prevent it? >>> guardian angel revealed. the woman saved in the nick of time after her terrible accident on the highway finally meets the man who came out of nowhere to rescue her. wait until you hear what she said to him. >>> into the abyss. the fearless female daredevils defying gravity more than 3,000 feet in the air. why they say doing this is safe. the mind-blowing moves going viral this morning. >>> and good morning, america. robin and sam are off today. and it's shaping up to be a very busy tuesday. so much to get to. including the father of 16-year-old hannah anderson. he is now speaking out for the first time since hannah's kidnapping. what an ord
>> welcome to al jazeera america. here is a look at our headlines. the syrian government accused of chemical warfare on its own people, the the opposition group said the government killed hundreds of women and children. former egyptian president hosni mubarak may be released from house arrest within a few hours. and bradley manning sentenced to 35 years behind bars for leaking classified information. now his attorney wants help from the president. [♪ music ] >> we begin tonight with atrocities in syria and accusations of chemical warfare. it could put more pressure on president obama to get involved in the dispute. opposition groups are claiming that the government used chemical weapons in the overnight offensive. we want to warn you that some of the pictures we want to show you are extremely graphic. they show injured people being treated by hospital workers while others lie motionless. activists athey are victims of banned chemical weapons fired by government forces. and other video shows survivors struggling to breathe. al jazeera cannot verify the videos but if proved true
morning, america. >>> we are following breaking news out of the philippines. hundreds missing after a ferry accident there. we are joined live with the latest. good morning, nick. >> reporter: good morning, rob. this is really a race against time right now. the ferry was just a few hundred feet from shore when a cargo ship rammed into it. now it's a frantic search for survivors. this morning, divers are in the water, hoping to find the hundreds of people still missing. look at the power of this impact. it rips through the cargo ship. most of the 870 passengers and crew were sleeping when the ferry was sawed in half. the impact sounded like an explosion, many passengers were trapped. others had to jump into the ocean. the lucky ones got to the shore covered in gas and oil. shocked survivors waited for help. and out of the water, emergency workers rescued an 11-month old infant. the ferry sank so quickly, this man shows it rose right up to his neck. i thought about my child, he says. thank god someone saved us so quickly. at daybreak, families who didn't know if loved ones lived or di
. >>> live from america's news headquarters. president obama meeting top national security advisors on the escalating crisis in syria as the pentagon confirms the u.s. is preparing for a possible strike against the assad regime. today humanitarian groups are claiming nearly 400 people were killed and thousands injured in the suspected chemical weapons attack this week. last year the president said any confirmed wmd strike would provoke a u.s. response. >>> also in the capital, tens of thousands of american s gatherig on the national mall commemorating since martin luther king jr.'s 1963 march on washington and his iconic "i have a dream" speech. he told the crowd "the journey is not complete. we can and we must do more." get you now back to "cavuto on business." >>> at least the nasdaq got ahead of naming its latest flub a flash freeze. sounds so much better than flash crash. i don't know if a three-hour shut down counts as a flash or anything. charlie, i don't know. not encouraged. >> this is really bad. the biggest culprit is the securities and exchange commission which three year
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